Value

A 5-post collection

Challenge #02739-G182: Do Not Pay Your Heart

This is from this prompt :-)

https://steemit.com/fiction/@internutter/challenge-02446-f256-do-no-harm

The medic known as Allie had gained quite the reputation. She had managed to save people that everyone else had said were not savable. She'd managed to cure those that were said to be incurable. More than one elite had made it a point to find the station she was working at to bring sick relatives and have her see to them.

But now a choice was being given to her. Several were offering large sums of Time for her to work for them and leave the station. But here at the station, there were hundreds who needed her, many could not pay, of course, but without her they, or a family member, would likely perish. But how to explain it to the wealthy ones who thought such talent was wasted on the poor? -- Anon Guest

When one is talented at giving the hopeless hope, giving those without a chance a new chance, or giving those facing their ends a new start, one gets to be known. Medik Allie was both Medik and Lucker, giving her Luck to others so that they could have another chance. Following the Vorax Rescue, the wealthy had noticed.

Galactic Economics tends to prevent obscene wealth accumulation, but the Alliance can't be everywhere and they can't stop every loophole. There will always be the kind of person who's the head of an amount of wealth akin to the body of a swollen tick about to paralyse its victim. The kind of person who, like the tick, are not healthy to have around in large numbers.

Technology can only do so much. Genes can only be cleansed of imperfections so many times. Organs can only be replaced so many times. And, in the era before B'Nar made its technology available[1], only so many times one body could be repaired. Some retreated into techno-sarcophagi, with nanotechnology keeping their brain alive when their body failed. They would pilot humanoid puppets and pay extensive amounts of money to keep their machines alive. Sooner or later, those parasites ran out of profits and fell by the wayside. One did not want to live and die like that.

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Challenge #02613-G056: Trash to Treasure

She lived in the United States circa 2020. Well, it was New Year's. The first day of that year. Deep in debt, stressed, tired, her entire body hurt, she laid back on her recliner to sleep praying for something to help her. She'd ended up in debt because she'd bent over backward to save family members and they'd left her with their bills. But, before that, she'd drained her bank accounts nearly dry saving other people who were homeless, taking them into

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Challenge #02338-F148: Words May Never

They meant to hurt you with words and bring you down by demeaning you. You became inspired to do something entirely different. -- Anon Guest

Say something long enough, it becomes true. Words like weirdo, freak, idiot, and so forth don't hurt in small doses, but if they are said often enough, by enough people, to one, that one can easily believe they are worthless. It happens so often, but it does not happen to all.

Consider Suz' Mayberry, iconoclast of Elderwine

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Challenge #01908-E084: Pearls and Male Chauvinist...

Reading Sir Terry Prachett's works and having it just passed of as 'light reading' at University. -- Anon Guest

She opened the book to read it and relax while she had her lunch and a coffee. Unfortunately, it was also dudebro o'clock, and a man-child had to come and comment on her material.

"You're reading that? I thought you were intelligent..."

Sue put the book by Sir Pterry down and glared at him. She had never met this man before, didn't know

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Challenge #01580-D119: Alto-nate Talent

Alto. Never to sing those high intricate vocal solos beloved of Opera fans. Altos get stuck in the choir. -- Knitnan

Keep the tune. Keep the rhythm. Let the sopranos, the tenors and the basso profundos drown you out. That's all the Altos are good for, they say. That and pop music, which is famously lacking in melody[1], and famously full of atonal yelling down the microphones. Which was all too bad, because Gail loved to sing, and she was an

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